Reading Intervention Activities that Students Love

Image features children sitting on a park bench reading and the title, "Reading Intervention Ideas That Students Love".
Keep reading intervention fun with these ideas that students love.

Introduction

It’s almost testing season. If you’re anything like me, you’re looking for some great reading intervention activities that students love that don’t make you feel like you’re “teaching to the test”. Well, you’re in luck! My friends and I are here with a collection of wonderful reading intervention ideas that your upper elementary students are sure to love. AND, the best part is they’re not your typical “test prep” activities and strategies so you’ll be excited to weave them into your days throughout the year.

Reading Intervention Activities Like Choice Boards Are Always a Hit

I have been an upper elementary teacher since 2009, but I taught preschool, kindergarten, or 1st grade in the 80s, 90s, and 2000s, and also worked as a reading interventionist for a while. Some things I have learned about working with students who need reading support is that the activities have to be engaging. A lot of my mini escape rooms, matching, cut-and-paste/drag-and-drop activities, two-person games, and choice boards that I use with my students use Orton-Gillingham affixes, roots, vocabulary, synonyms, antonyms, and parts-of-speech. Read more about teaching vocabulary with a beautiful mentor text here.

The image features a cut and paste worksheet and a fill-in-the-blank answer key.
Students absolutely love cut-and-paste activities with decodable answers and playing around with synonyms.
Image features task cards, note pages, and character cards.
Students receiving reading intervention often need remediation on lower-level skills such as fact vs. opinion.

Fact and Opinion Activities that Students Love

Students receiving reading intervention often need remediation on lower-level skills such as fact vs. opinion. In her blog post, Activities and Lessons for Teaching Fact and Opinion, Janet of Fishyrobb shares a few of her favorite mentor texts for teaching this skill plus a highly engaging activity in which students solve crimes using fact and opinion statements.

Word Study Activities that Students Love

For years, Carla from Comprehension Connection worked as a reading specialist providing intervention services. Over that period of time, several models were used including pushing into the classroom and team teaching with the classroom teachers in small groups, a small group pull out model, and in a tutoring model. In the primary grades, Carla focused much of the time on word building activities and shared reading. Each student kept a word study notebook, and her groups worked daily on word building skills according to their spelling stage. Students loved word hunts and working with magnetic letters. They also enjoyed card games and games like SWAT where they worked to identify words by pattern.

Image features hands touching movable alphabet letters and the title, "Use Word Building Activities to Build Phonics Knowledge & Decoding Skills".
Use Word Building Activities to Build Phonics Knowledge & Decoding Skills

Word study is essential for upper elementary students, too. Most of her upper elementary students fell in the Within Word Stage or Syllable Juncture Stage. You might check out her tips for these stages too. You can check out Carla’s series for word study here.

Image features a 9 panel comic on a tablet.
Using comics or graphic novels in your teaching is a fun way to keep your students motivated.

Using comics can even increase a student’s vocabulary. She has shared different comic strip websites and her own digital template creations to use with your students.

Activities with Comics and Graphic Novels that Students Love

Using comics or graphic novels in your teaching is a fun way to keep your students motivated. Sandy from Sweet Integrations shares how reluctant readers and writers get excited over using comics because comics writing is less intensive. In her blog post Using Digital Comics to Motivate Reluctant Readers and Writers, she explains how students can be imaginative in their writing and creative in their choice of characters and props.

Summarizing Activities that Students Love

When it comes to reading intervention, students are often given “more of the same” instruction instead of new and engaging ways to practice tough skills. Kady from Teacher Trap knows that just doing more of what didn’t work doesn’t get you very far! In her blog post, How to Teach Summarizing, she shares ways to help students master the challenging skill of summary by using graphic organizers, group work, and fun activities that students love.

Image features an anchor chart with the title, "Writing an Effective Summary".
When it comes to reading intervention, students are often given “more of the same” instruction instead of new and engaging ways to practice tough skills.
Pictured is a Venn diagram with two faces that overlap for comparing two characters from Miss Rumphius.
Open ended interventions are great for both struggling and advanced readers!

Engaging Interventions All Students Will Love

Traditional teaching methods often leave behind both the struggling reader and the one miles ahead. Our challenge is to bridge this gap, to find strategies that lift up those who lag behind and provide wings to those ready to soar. In her blog post, Engaging Interventions All Your Students Will Love Susan Morrow from Keep ’em Thinking talks about the power of open-ended reading interventions. She does a deep dive into four specific strategies appropriate for both struggling and advanced readers that aid comprehension and build a lifelong love for reading and learning.

Conclusion

Hopefully, you’ve had a chance to visit my friends’ blogs and gather some great ideas for reading intervention groups, enrichment groups, and whole group activities that all of your students will enjoy and benefit from throughout the year, every year. Let me know which ideas you’d like to try in the comments!

This Post Has 3 Comments

  1. Esther Conrriquez

    Thanks for sharing these great ideas. Always looking for new ways to engage my students.

  2. Beth Dennis

    Just what I have been needing for my small groups!

  3. Stephanie

    I love the tip to use comics to engage students! I can see that being quite a hit. Thank you!

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